UNIX system architecture book

Rob McNelly

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Rob McNelly

IBM Premier Business Partner from Meridian IT Inc.

Rob McNelly got his first big break when he started working with three IBM AS/400's as a computer operator. Although he still remembers OS/400 fondly, he now spends most of his time with AIX and Linux on IBM Power servers. Rob spent six years with IBM Global Services in Boulder Colorado, and is now employed by IBM Premier Business Partner Meridian IT in a pre and post sales role. Rob is a Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHCE) and an IBM Certified Advanced Technical Expert (CATE).

Rob has worked in computer operations, systems management, systems architecture, and planning for organizations ranging from healthcare to financial services to retail.

AIXchange is meant to be an exchange of tips, ideas, and information around IBM's Power systems and AIX operating system. Although Rob tries to exclusively write about these topics, now and again you will find him reminiscing about computing environments from twenty years ago, along with observations on tools and techniques that are useful for system administrators.

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* Postings on non-IBM sites are independent of IBM and do not necessarily represent IBM's positions, strategies or opinions.

Chris Gibson

AIX and PowerVM Specialist, Southern Cross Computer Systems

Chris Gibson is an AIX and PowerVM specialist located in Melbourne, Australia. An IBM CATE, AIX, Chris has over 10 years of AIX experience and 20 years working in IT, Chris is keen to share his knowledge with the AIX community. He works with clients to help design and implement AIX and PowerVM solutions running on the IBM Power platform. One of the co-authors of the IBM Redbooks publication, "NIM from A to Z in AIX 5L", Chris has also written numerous technical articles on AIX and PowerVM. A regular contributor to the IBM developerWorks AIX and UNIX technical library. His articles have covered many of the latest AIX and Power technologies, such as Micro-Partitioning, Virtual I/O, Live Partition Mobility and Active Memory Sharing. Chris also writes his own AIX blog on the IBM developerWorks website.

Here is a full list of all of Chris's

Chris's AIX blog is a place where ideas, information and experiences with AIX and PowerVM can be shared. Chris provides regular updates on his real-world experiences with AIX/PowerVM and offers advice on implementing these technologies. Chris hopes that by sharing his ideas with the AIX community, it will foster a culture of collaboration within the IBM developerWorks AIX community.

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Q&A

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How execute able files are identifies in unix and linux operating system?

what would be the extionsion

Linux is not windows - files are not identified by their extension although there sometimes is an unofficial naming standard for files
(like .pl for perl scripts or .bin for binary files)
Linux is far more sophisticated than that.
You could rename an executable file and that would not make it unexecutable.
Executable binary files are identified by their 'magic' which is the first few bytes of the file.
If you use the file command like this : file <filename> it will look at the fil magic and let you know wht type of file it is

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What is the difference bwteen Unix and Linux Operating System?

Dedcribe the Unix and Linux OS and Give the difference Betweem Them

Unix is popular operating system, developed by AT&T in 1969, that was very important in the development of the Internet. It is a multi-processing, multi-user, family of operating systems that run on a variety of architechtures. UNIX allows more than one user to access a computer system at the same time.
A widely used Open Source Unix-like operating system. Linux was first released by its inventor Linus Torvalds in 1991. There are versions of Linux for almost every available type of computer hardware from desktop machines to IBM mainframes. The inner workings of Linux are open and avai…